athelind: (WARNING: TV Tropes)
I watched the first episode of The Muppets last night.

First impressions: where the classic Muppet Show had backstage wackiness, The Muppets, thus far, has backstage wangstiness.

This is not to say I’m not interested to see where they take it. They haven’t lost me yet. They’re just patterning themselves on sitcoms that I already don’t watch, and, well, it’s hard to parody shows that are already parodies. I'm not going to whinge about dragging "children's icons" into the morass of "adult humor"; I am well aware that the Muppets have always relied on multi-level appeal and getting crap past the radar.

In their quest to make the characters more "sophisticated", however, they seem to have thrown out the subtlety and slyness that really was sophisticated. Worse, they've taken characters who used to be lovable because of their flaws and are busily making them unlikable despite their virtues.

Seriously, if they want to take a cast of over-the-top archetypes who indulge in broad slapstick and introduce sophisticated, emotionally-intense story arcs that appeal to an adult audience, they’d be better served by following the lead of the current crop of Precious Cinnamon Roll cartoons, rather than stuff like 30 Rock or The Office.

If the Steven Universe writers had written the Kermit/Piggy break-up, it would have been heart-wrenching. It would have pulled you closer to both characters, rather than feeling alienated from them because of their pettiness.

I am going to give it a few more episodes to see where they take this.


athelind: (AAAAAA)
Tonight, [livejournal.com profile] thoughtsdriftby and I were watching the second-season finale to Fox's Sleepy Hollow On Demand -- and it cut off at 41 minutes of 55, right as the intensity was building to the big climax.

Here's the problem: Sleepy Hollow is something of a guilty pleasure. It's a quirky, high-concept show, with baroque, convoluted plotlines held together largely by the sheer charm and chemistry of the two leads, and it's largely been flailing around for the latter half of this season, trying to find its footing after the resolution of the main McGuffin of the original story arc. When you slam into a brick wall right as everything is about to be resolved to set up for next season's baroque, convoluted plotline ... all those twisty plot threads just kind of fall into a tangle, and you find yourself wondering why you were so caught up in such a ludicrous, cornball cheesefest.

I am hoping that most of this is being angry at Comcast. On an intellectual level, I would vaguely like to find out what happens to Ichabod and Abigail in those last ten minutes, and where they're going to leave them for summer break ... or leave them entirely, since the show's renewal status still seems to be up in the air. This has just delivered a solid hit on my emotional investment in the show.


athelind: (hoard potato)
This morning, [livejournal.com profile] leonard_arlotte said:

So I've seen commercials for Tomorrow People, but ain't watched it. I am left with a nagging question.

What's the difference between this show and Alphas?

I did see the commercial and think, "Oh look, another show about pretty people with super powers" ...



That's a pretty glib dismissal ... but it's not wrong.

I watched the first episode, and really, the big difference between the two shows is that I didn't want to immediately smack everybody in Alphas, protagonist and antagonist alike.

The big conflict in this show is "OH NOES NORMALS HATE US BECAUSE WE'RE BEAUTIFUL WE HAVE POWERS!!1!"

... just like every other Pretty People With Powers series in the last decade. Heroes, the 4400, Alphas ... even the X-Movies. Show after show after show, and it's all Maintaining the Masquerade so the Mundanes don't Molest the Metahumans. The protagonists only deal with two kinds of adversaries: Dark Conspiracies Who Want To Herd Them All Into Labs and/or "Cure" Them, and Bad People With Powers That Have The Exact Same Origin As Ours.

Assuming you can tell the protagonists from the antagonists, of course.

Moreover ... every single one of these shows characterizes the Pretty People With Powers as "The Next Evolutionary Step" that will "Drive Humanity To Extinction". It's not always just the paranoid norms who think so, either.*

I, for one, am bored with this. It's ... metahuman masturbation, is what it is. All the conflict centers around The Powers, and if you take The Powers away (as several interchangeable adversaries want to do), all the conflict vanishes.

It's like they think viewers aren't smart enough to handle a world that has more than one crazy thing going on at a time.

The sad part is that The Tomorrow People is a remake of a classic BBC series from the 1970s, the era that gave us Blake's 7, and Pertwee and Baker as Doctor Who.**

By contrast, take a look at what they threw at the original 1970s version of Tomorrow People. Aliens! Robots! Alien Robots!

Think the new series is going to touch that subplot where the Tomorrow People are in touch with the "Galactic Federation", who shepherd developing telepathic races as they "break out"?

I don't.

And that's a pity.


* To give Alphas its due, Professor X Dr. Rosen at least paid lip service to the idea that the Alphas were just exceptional humans at the skinny end of the bell curve ... but he was about the only person in the show who did, and even he didn't seem to buy it completely.
** Don't get pedantic with me. That's how they're listed in the credits.
athelind: (WARNING: TV Tropes)
According to Wikipedia, the full designation of the Robot from Lost In Space is the B-9, Class M-3 General Utility Non-Theorizing Environmental Control Robot.

How in the name of everything did they resist the temptation to dub the thing "G.U.N.Th.E.R."?

This is now Troped, of course.


athelind: (hoard potato)
Ah, summertime. Warm weather, ice cream, barbecue, and big-screen blockbusters -- and, as the broadcast networks settle firmly into Mid-Season hiatus, cable TV brings us new episodes of shows far better than anything the mainstream offers.

Two of my favorite shows have their season premieres this week: Burn Notice returned on Thursday, and Leverage debuts tomorrow night. Both shows, of course, involve ensembles of quirky characters, experts in a variety of extralegal activities, who band together to help the Victim of the Week get revenge on the bad guys making their lives difficult, while pursuing the not-entirely-benevolent agendas of their nominal leaders.

The big difference is a matter of resources: the Burn Notice team tends to scrounge and improvise, and have to stay off the grid most of the time; they deal with gangs, drug dealers, and the occasional international terrorist. The Leverage crew, on the other claw, scored big on their first outing, and have huge wads of cash to finance bleeding-edge technology; their adversaries are unscrupulous corporations and con men who screw the little people in ways that make them hard to touch in a court of law..

They both fall into my favorite genre: cool, competent people being cool and competent.

When you have two shows that are so similar in so many ways, you just have to ask yourself ...

Who'd Win?

If the team from Burn Notice somehow wound up on opposite sides from the Leverage team, who'd wind up on top when the dust clears? Let's ignore all the logical reasons about why they wouldn't ever get in a head-to-head; maybe it's mistaken identity; maybe David Xanatos arranges it all; maybe Nate Ford and Sam Axe meet in a bar, get drunk, and make a really, really stupid bet ...

... you know, that last sounds the most plausible.

[Poll #1755797]

Please explain your answer in the comments!



athelind: (Eye - VK)
In the tradition of [livejournal.com profile] paka and [livejournal.com profile] hafoc:

"Jane Austen. Novelist.

"Gentlemen, we can rebuild her. We have the technology."


athelind: (cronkite)
[Error: unknown template qotd]

Do you think the government should have the right to censor the media? If you're generally against censorship, are there any circumstances under which you feel it might be warranted?

Unca Bob had this one down:

When any government, or any church for that matter, undertakes to say to its subjects, "This you may not read, this you must not see, this you are forbidden to know," the end result is tyranny and oppression, no matter how holy the motives. Mighty little force is needed to control a man whose mind has been hoodwinked; contrariwise, no amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. No, not the rack, not fission bombs, not anything—you can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him.

—Robert Anson Heinlein, "If This Goes On—" (1940)



That, by the way, is from a short novel about a Fundamentalist takeover of the United States after a "backwoods preacher" is elected President in 2012.1

Heinlein also said, "The whole principle is wrong; it's like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't eat steak."

Now, Unca Bob, especially in the second quote, was talking about what Wikipedia calls moral censorship2, the suppression of speech that some individuals might find offensive or immoral; that is, in my estimation, subtly different from military censorship.

It is the opinion of Your Obedient Serpent that both "moral" and "military" censorship are always wrong; however, there are instances when the latter might be less bad than the alternatives. A Fully Transparent Government would not have survived World War II, and the most likely replacement had even less regard to such niceties.

It's a key part of my ethical system, however, that being forced to do bad things to avoid worse consequences does not make them good things; when you allow yourself to frame the kind of secrecy and suppression practiced in WWII as "good", you take the first step on the slippery slope that justifies political censorship, and all the cover-ups and black projects that burden us today.

I also don't automatically equate industry ratings systems as "censorship", although the MPAA has certainly demonstrated that they can be arbitrary and putative, and big studios, finding that "General Audience" films are often ignored, often tack extra nude scenes or coarse language to get an otherwise-acceptable movie out of the "kiddie ghetto"—an ironic kind of anti-censorship. Marvel Comics has implemented an entirely functional ratings system for their comics, however; while most adult comic readers are wholly unaware that Marvel even has one, the discreet little letter codes in the UPC symbol box provide a useful guide to parents looking for suitable reading material for their children, and comic store workers attempting to assist them.

I could go on, but I expect these opinions to get thoroughly Disassembled in the comments. I haven't even touched on the idea of "hate crimes" yet.


1The same timeline has a well-established Lunar colony at this point; grumbling about only getting the crappy parts of future histories may now commence.

2Wikipedia distinguishes between "moral" and "religious" censorship; please pardon me if I consider that to be hair-splitting.

athelind: (Warning: Memetic Hazard)
Oops!

I was going to post the last answer to The Better Than It Sounds Meme a week ago, and I forgot.

For those of you still keeping track, the only description left unguessed was #2:

Two small children and an adorable puppy help a career police officer come to terms with the death of his wife.


I gave the following hints:

  • It's a movie.
  • This description spoils the last ten to fifteen minutes.
  • The police officer has drug issues.


And the answer is behind the cut! )


Please don't hurt me.
athelind: (no help whatsoever)
Okay, [livejournal.com profile] paka was wrong: posting my own version of the Better Than It Sounds Meme only made me feel stupider, when I realized how vague and general some of my descriptions were.

#8 is the worst. The problem, obviously, is that the description I gave could describe dozens of other movies; I think I described a full-on trope rather than a single movie.

I'll go ahead and post the rest of the answers tomorrow night, but for now, let's see if some hints will help: )

Have fun, and please don't shoot me when the answers come out!

"Please don't shoot me" could work as a hint for at least two of the really tough ones, come to think of it.
athelind: (WARNING: TV Tropes)
This one's going around:

Pick 20 movies/anime/video games/literary works/comics/etc and put their summaries from the TV Tropes entry, Better Than it Sounds, and have your friends guess what they are.


The original meme was to use entries directly from the page, but most everyone I read seems to be writing their own summaries. I agree with [livejournal.com profile] paka: this meme makes me feel stupid, and the best way around that is to do my own version!

(The original meme also specifies "No Cheating", but I hardly need to add that, since a) you can't look these up at TV Tropes, and b) the people who read my LJ, by and large, aren't assholes.)

Since this is the Do-It-Myself version, you only get eight (I may come back and round it out to ten). Movies, comics, short stories, novels, TV shows, whatever: they're all fair game. Be advised that there's at least one really egregious spoiler in this list.

Oh, and some of them may not be better than they sound....

I'll bold these as people get them, but I'll only put the answers behind a cut, so EVERYONE can play.

  1. An explosive encounter with a rebellious teen forces forces a repressed professional man to confront his inner demons in this Cold War allegory.
  2. Two small children and an adorable puppy help a career police officer come to terms with the death of his wife.
  3. A man with a debilitating medical condition risks his health, sanity and personal integrity to help a man in a dead-end job find a new direction.
  4. A long-haul rig, a cute teenager, and no gas stations in sight: Hilarity Ensues.
  5. A band of reclusive senior citizens pull the strings on an implausible series of events to bring a hard-headed cop and a stubborn nurse together. After the pair get hitched, their kids go into the family business.
  6. At the height of the Cold War, a stoic, implacable polymath and his scantily-clad companion stand against a cadre of terrorists who plot to turn advanced technology against the international diplomats of the Security Council.
  7. A beleaguered ad man neglects his family as he tries to save his failing company, but a clumsy, slobbering St. Bernard will make this summer one they'll never forget!
  8. An urban professional's civil servant's job performance becomes increasingly erratic as he becomes increasingly obsessed with his job.


Answers! )


If you do see some of these summaries on the various TV Tropes pages at some later date, remember that Your Obedient Serpent is a regular contributor to said wiki.
I am so going to hell for some of these....

athelind: (Eye - VK)
I appreciate everyone who's pointed me to Hulu and Torrent, but, frankly, an important part of watching TV is the opportunity to pull my face AWAY from the computer for a while.


athelind: (Eye - VK)
I appreciate everyone who's pointed me to Hulu and Torrent, but, frankly, an important part of watching TV is the opportunity to pull my face AWAY from the computer for a while.


athelind: (Eye - VK)
In all the sorrow and confusion of my current situation, there are also small annoyances that arise. One such nuisance: I find myself now bereft of a DVR.

I suspect that much of our recent* increase in television viewing was due not just to a plethora of interesting programs, but to the ease and convenience that the DVR provided: for the first time, recording shows and watching them at a later time had become simpler than just turning on the TV and watching a show "live".

As previous posts have mentioned, my regular TV viewing has been whittled down to a handful of shows. However, an annoying number of them air on nights that I work, and the rest are cable shows with unpredictable timeslots.

Several of them have ongoing narratives that I would regret losing track of:

  • Heroes
  • Supernatural
  • Leverage
  • Burn Notice


Anybody out there recording any of those who might want to do a weekly-ish TV Couch Potato Party?

I've realized that much of our recent* increase in television viewing was due not just to a plethora of interesting programs, but to the ease and convenience that the DVR provided: for the first time, recording shows and watching them at a later time had become simpler than just turning on the TV and watching a show "live".


*"Recent" as in "over the last decade", not "over the last season or two", which has seen us dropping shows fairly rapidly, as my journal entries have discussed. It's now come into question just how much of that has really been due to increasing impatience with network offerings vs. increasing impatience with other matters in our lives.

(I also watch Castle and the Mentalist, but those are lighter shows less reliant on narrative, and I doubt anyone else out there's recording them.)

athelind: (Eye - VK)
In all the sorrow and confusion of my current situation, there are also small annoyances that arise. One such nuisance: I find myself now bereft of a DVR.

I suspect that much of our recent* increase in television viewing was due not just to a plethora of interesting programs, but to the ease and convenience that the DVR provided: for the first time, recording shows and watching them at a later time had become simpler than just turning on the TV and watching a show "live".

As previous posts have mentioned, my regular TV viewing has been whittled down to a handful of shows. However, an annoying number of them air on nights that I work, and the rest are cable shows with unpredictable timeslots.

Several of them have ongoing narratives that I would regret losing track of:

  • Heroes
  • Supernatural
  • Leverage
  • Burn Notice


Anybody out there recording any of those who might want to do a weekly-ish TV Couch Potato Party?

I've realized that much of our recent* increase in television viewing was due not just to a plethora of interesting programs, but to the ease and convenience that the DVR provided: for the first time, recording shows and watching them at a later time had become simpler than just turning on the TV and watching a show "live".


*"Recent" as in "over the last decade", not "over the last season or two", which has seen us dropping shows fairly rapidly, as my journal entries have discussed. It's now come into question just how much of that has really been due to increasing impatience with network offerings vs. increasing impatience with other matters in our lives.

(I also watch Castle and the Mentalist, but those are lighter shows less reliant on narrative, and I doubt anyone else out there's recording them.)

athelind: (Eye - VK)
[livejournal.com profile] quelonzia and I sat down to watch our recording of the premiere of V last night.

Fans of the original series will not be disappointed: it was completely faithful to the original.

The acting was wooden, the scripting was heavy-handed, the motivations were weak, the characters were unlikable, and the glaring Plot Stupidity of the original was wholly intact.

We didn't get past the first half-hour.

Pity. I had high hopes, considering the cast was packed with veterans of some of the best SF shows of the last decade.

Now I'm kind of nostalgic for the first couple of seasons of Earth: Final Conflict.


athelind: (Eye - VK)
[livejournal.com profile] quelonzia and I sat down to watch our recording of the premiere of V last night.

Fans of the original series will not be disappointed: it was completely faithful to the original.

The acting was wooden, the scripting was heavy-handed, the motivations were weak, the characters were unlikable, and the glaring Plot Stupidity of the original was wholly intact.

We didn't get past the first half-hour.

Pity. I had high hopes, considering the cast was packed with veterans of some of the best SF shows of the last decade.

Now I'm kind of nostalgic for the first couple of seasons of Earth: Final Conflict.


athelind: (AAAAAA)
Your Obedient Serpent has no idea what he's gonna do to relax in the near future, because all the things he's frittered away his spare-and-not-so-spare time on over the years actively piss him off right now.

This is, in part, because he's frittered away so much of his life on them, and in part because, well, Busman's Holiday. One of his sources of stress is his low-paying retail job, selling all those time-consuming distractions.


athelind: (Default)
Your Obedient Serpent has no idea what he's gonna do to relax in the near future, because all the things he's frittered away his spare-and-not-so-spare time on over the years actively piss him off right now.

This is, in part, because he's frittered away so much of his life on them, and in part because, well, Busman's Holiday. One of his sources of stress is his low-paying retail job, selling all those time-consuming distractions.


athelind: (Warning: Motivation Hazard)
With [livejournal.com profile] quelonzia back on a serious reading jag (thanks to her bionic lens replacement from last year), and Your Obedient Serpent working three nights a week, our TV habit is falling by the wayside once again. We drift in and out of it as seasons pass; recent years have been close to an all-time high for us, but now, scheduling, distractions, and the previously-mentioned ebb in SF-related shows have created the Perfect Storm of Turn Off The TV.

Today, we finally trimmed our timer list down to half-a-dozen regular-season shows -- and one of those may get dumped later:
  • Supernatural
  • Castle
  • The Mentalist
  • Flash Forward
  • Heroes
  • CSI: New York

Note that this is our regular season list; summer shows and half-season shows like Leverage, Burn Notice and Doctor Who are still on the list.

Shows that disappointed us or had become a chore to watch are gone. The survivors grabbed us, pulled us into their stories, made us laugh, or, in general, just made us happy to invite these people into our homes on a weekly basis.

CSI is gone; we've honestly just been watching it through inertia for a long time, and losing William Petersen last season -- while I liked Laurence Fishburne's character more than Quel did, we really watched the show for Grissom.

Criminal Minds is gone, because we just haven't found ourselves in the mood to watch it. We watched the opening, found it hard to follow (possibly because we tried watching it right after the Forgotten fried our brains with sheer tedium), and, after some procrastinating, realized that we just didn't care enough to push through it.

CSI: New York still has Gary Sinise, which is honestly why it made our list in the first place five years ago; at the moment, that's enough to keep us recording it... though we still haven't sat down to watch it this season.

I think that, after nine years, we're just plain burned out on forensics, profilers, getting into the heads of sick, twisted people, or diving into the bodies of just plain dead ones. Castle and The Mentalist are murder mysteries, but they get a pass because they're throwbacks to the Eccentric Detective Shows of the '70s and '80s. Quel and I enjoy watching Smart, Competent People do Smart, Competent Things*; that's why our pet procedurals got us watching in the first place. Over the years, though, they've focused less and less on the Smart People Being Smart, and more and more on the Twisted People Being Twisted.

And we're tired of inviting those people into our home.


*Yes, we also enjoy Heroes. Shut up. And don't even try to dis Supernatural here.
athelind: (Default)
With [livejournal.com profile] quelonzia back on a serious reading jag (thanks to her bionic lens replacement from last year), and Your Obedient Serpent working three nights a week, our TV habit is falling by the wayside once again. We drift in and out of it as seasons pass; recent years have been close to an all-time high for us, but now, scheduling, distractions, and the previously-mentioned ebb in SF-related shows have created the Perfect Storm of Turn Off The TV.

Today, we finally trimmed our timer list down to half-a-dozen regular-season shows -- and one of those may get dumped later:
  • Supernatural
  • Castle
  • The Mentalist
  • Flash Forward
  • Heroes
  • CSI: New York

Note that this is our regular season list; summer shows and half-season shows like Leverage, Burn Notice and Doctor Who are still on the list.

Shows that disappointed us or had become a chore to watch are gone. The survivors grabbed us, pulled us into their stories, made us laugh, or, in general, just made us happy to invite these people into our homes on a weekly basis.

CSI is gone; we've honestly just been watching it through inertia for a long time, and losing William Petersen last season -- while I liked Laurence Fishburne's character more than Quel did, we really watched the show for Grissom.

Criminal Minds is gone, because we just haven't found ourselves in the mood to watch it. We watched the opening, found it hard to follow (possibly because we tried watching it right after the Forgotten fried our brains with sheer tedium), and, after some procrastinating, realized that we just didn't care enough to push through it.

CSI: New York still has Gary Sinise, which is honestly why it made our list in the first place five years ago; at the moment, that's enough to keep us recording it... though we still haven't sat down to watch it this season.

I think that, after nine years, we're just plain burned out on forensics, profilers, getting into the heads of sick, twisted people, or diving into the bodies of just plain dead ones. Castle and The Mentalist are murder mysteries, but they get a pass because they're throwbacks to the Eccentric Detective Shows of the '70s and '80s. Quel and I enjoy watching Smart, Competent People do Smart, Competent Things*; that's why our pet procedurals got us watching in the first place. Over the years, though, they've focused less and less on the Smart People Being Smart, and more and more on the Twisted People Being Twisted.

And we're tired of inviting those people into our home.


*Yes, we also enjoy Heroes. Shut up. And don't even try to dis Supernatural here.
athelind: (hoard potato)
After eight seasons, [livejournal.com profile] queloniza has finally given up on Smallville, walking out at the 45-minute mark on the Season Premiere. "It finally jumped the shark," she said, though honestly, it's spent more time on the far side of the tank than an RV full of retirees spends in Florida.

I'm going to keep watching it, at least for a while; as someone who works in a comic book store, it's almost a job requirement. I thought Season 8 was a lot better than the previous two or three, despite the loss of Michael Rosenbaum as Lex (which, honestly, was Quel's real shark-jumping moment); Season 9, on the other claw, is starting off a bit rough.

Not many shows stay on the DVR timer long if only one of us is watching; the last one was Ghost Whisperer, which lost me at the Obvious Shark-Jumping Point last November; Quel stubbornly stuck with it, but didn't make it to the season finale.

Scoreboard thus far:

New Shows:
Flash Forward has our attention. Good cast, intriguing premise, lots of mystery.

The Forgotten failed to grab us by the 45-minute mark. It more than failed to grab us, really; much as we wanted to watch Christian Slater after the ignominious cancellation of the smarter, snappier version of Dollhouse, the show dragged, and we just couldn't see watching this band of amateurs bumble around week after week. The premise might have made a good movie, but as a weekly series, it seems contrived and implausible.

That's right, some one who's watched every single season of Smallville just accused a show of being contrived and implausible.

Eastwick may have hit a new record: we didn't make it to the 20-minute mark before deleting the timer.

We made it through the full premiere of The Vampire Diaries, but ultimately, it was just too teenybopper for us.

Returning Shows:
We'll be catching up on the premieres of our Police Procedurals on Sunday. As for the other shows on our current list:

Castle remains fun and fluffy. It's the kind of silly, throwback Cute Detective show that we'd normally roll our eyes and ignore, but, you know. Nathan Fillion.

Heroes looks like it's heading into its best season ever. The writers have finally fond their footing, and have a definite direction.

Finally... Supernatural continues to rock. It has never, ever jumped the shark; Sam and Dean just dove right into the tank and made sushi out of that bad boy.


athelind: (Default)
After eight seasons, [livejournal.com profile] queloniza has finally given up on Smallville, walking out at the 45-minute mark on the Season Premiere. "It finally jumped the shark," she said, though honestly, it's spent more time on the far side of the tank than an RV full of retirees spends in Florida.

I'm going to keep watching it, at least for a while; as someone who works in a comic book store, it's almost a job requirement. I thought Season 8 was a lot better than the previous two or three, despite the loss of Michael Rosenbaum as Lex (which, honestly, was Quel's real shark-jumping moment); Season 9, on the other claw, is starting off a bit rough.

Not many shows stay on the DVR timer long if only one of us is watching; the last one was Ghost Whisperer, which lost me at the Obvious Shark-Jumping Point last November; Quel stubbornly stuck with it, but didn't make it to the season finale.

Scoreboard thus far:

New Shows:
Flash Forward has our attention. Good cast, intriguing premise, lots of mystery.

The Forgotten failed to grab us by the 45-minute mark. It more than failed to grab us, really; much as we wanted to watch Christian Slater after the ignominious cancellation of the smarter, snappier version of Dollhouse, the show dragged, and we just couldn't see watching this band of amateurs bumble around week after week. The premise might have made a good movie, but as a weekly series, it seems contrived and implausible.

That's right, some one who's watched every single season of Smallville just accused a show of being contrived and implausible.

Eastwick may have hit a new record: we didn't make it to the 20-minute mark before deleting the timer.

We made it through the full premiere of The Vampire Diaries, but ultimately, it was just too teenybopper for us.

Returning Shows:
We'll be catching up on the premieres of our Police Procedurals on Sunday. As for the other shows on our current list:

Castle remains fun and fluffy. It's the kind of silly, throwback Cute Detective show that we'd normally roll our eyes and ignore, but, you know. Nathan Fillion.

Heroes looks like it's heading into its best season ever. The writers have finally fond their footing, and have a definite direction.

Finally... Supernatural continues to rock. It has never, ever jumped the shark; Sam and Dean just dove right into the tank and made sushi out of that bad boy.


athelind: (Eye of the Sky God)
This is making the rounds of my Friends List; for those who haven't seen it yet, it's my turn to share.







I always said that Unca Carl was a poet.


athelind: (Eye of the Sky God)
This is making the rounds of my Friends List; for those who haven't seen it yet, it's my turn to share.







I always said that Unca Carl was a poet.


November 2016

S M T W T F S
  12345
6 78 9101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930   

Tags

Page generated Jul. 22nd, 2017 02:45 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios